Thing Like Cricket!: The Friendship of Charters and Caldicott

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This weekend, Debbie from Moon in Gemini is hosting the You Gotta Have Friends Blogathon, honouring the beautiful thing that friendship is, on and off the screen. I was, for the occasion, inspired to write about the notorious British characters Charters and Caldicott, two friends portrayed by Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne.

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It all started with The Lady Vanishes (Alfred Hitchcock, 1938). This Hitchcock’s suspense is known for its variety of characters rich in personality and this includes Charters and Caldicott.

The two fellows are best known for being cricket addicts. They are always talking about it and for them, it seems that it’s all that matters in the world. In The Lady Vanishes, they are on their way back to Manchester for the Test Match and they simply CANNOT miss their train connexion at Bâle.

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On her side, Iris Henderson (Margaret Lockwood) has lost her friend Miss Froy (Dame May Whitty) and suspects something has happened to her. Oddly enough, everybody on the train tells her they haven’t seen her. Iris looks for witnesses and remembers Miss Froy had talked to Charters and Caldicott in the restaurant wagon when they were having tea. The two men pretend they don’t remember it, as they don’t want anything to interfere with their hurry to arrive in Manchester on time.

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See, cricket is the most important thing in life for them. They simply refuse to help because of it! And when Iris ask them how things like cricket can make them forget, it’s the supreme insult!

But as much as they try to avoid it, Charters and Caldicott will eventually be involved in the train situation that implies a bunch of spies.

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After having read that, you might think that Charters and Caldicott are not very sympathetic characters. But you are wrong. Their appearance in The Lady Vanishes was so appreciated by the public that they appeared in 3 other films: Night Train to Munich (Carol Reed, 1940), Crook’s Tour (John Baxter, 1941) and Millions Like Us (Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder, 1943). They were also part of the BBC radio serials Crook’s Tour and Secret Mission 609. A one season TV series called Charters & Caldicott was made in the 80s, but this one obviously doesn’t star Naunton Wayne and Basil Radford.

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Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne appeared in 8 other films together as different characters: The Next of Kin, Dead of Night, A Girl in a Million, Quartet, It’s Not Cricket, Passport to Pimlico, Stop Press Girl, and Helter Skelter. 

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Charters and Caldicott are like peas and carrots. One couldn’t exist without the other. They simply are like non-identical twins and their personalities connect perfectly. We have no doubt they have a big complicity and we’ll have the tendency to think that they met at a cricket match and discovered a common passion. They seem to be a bit selfish and snobbish, but, somehow, they are always involved in a political conflict: in The Lady Vanishes they take part in the final fight and help the “good ones” to escape with the train and cross the border. In Night Train to Munich, they help an old friend, Dickie Randall (Rex Harrison), and also Anna Bomasch (Margaret Lockwood) and her father Axel Bomasch (James Harcourt) to escape from the Nazis. In Crook’s Tour, they became owners, by accident, of a record containing secret instructions for the German Intelligence. Their appearance is very brief in Million’s Like Us, but once again they are here to help their country as two English soldiers fighting in the war (the second one).

Because yes, despite their indifference toward life, Charters and Caldicott turn out to be two jolly good fellows that are always willing to help. They are “very British” and would do everything to save the faith of their country, even if it includes risking their own life.

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Charters and Caldicott are English gentlemen that are hilarious and this, unwittingly. First, because of their strong and comical devotion to cricket, something that is quite anodyne. Then, for always putting themselves in some ridiculous situations, but always trying to be serious. I can think of this scene when they have to sleep in the maid’s room at the inn in The Lady Vanishes or when Charters has his face covered with whip cream when he attempts to pick save the famous record in Crook’s Tour.

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Their way of thinking and their life priorities are rather amusing too. One of the best examples is when, in Nigh Train to Munich, they learned that England is at war, and the first thing Charters thinks about is what will happen to his gold clubs (!). Or when, in the same film, Charters is reading Hitler’s Mein Kampf as if it was some little easy going lecture, as if it was an Archie Comic or something like that!

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Charters and Caldicott are always talking about cricket, but the funny thing is, in all the four films we actually never see them attending a match or playing themselves. No, they always seem to be travelling together, in countries with an unstable political situation.   This makes their character even more interesting and we surely are curious to know more about their life in England.

We have the pleasure to watch the four Charters and Caldicott films as each of them gives us more information about their life and their personality. In The Lady Vanishes, we don’t know much about them, except for the fact that they are cricket addicts. Bon. Then, in Night Train to Munich, we know that Caldicott went to college AND had a friend named Dickie Randall. We also know that Charters is not only a cricket’s addict, but also a golf ‘s addict. And, finally, we discover how patriotic they are, and how to be treated as good British subjects is very important to them (even if the German don’t seem to give a damn at all…). Crook’s Tour maybe is the most revealing of the three as Charters and Caldicott are the main characters of the film. The story depends on him. Here, we learn that Caldicott is engaged to Charter’s sister, the very authoritarian Edith (Noel Hood), who doesn’t seem to be an idealistic choice for him. We also learn their first name: Sinclair Caldicott and Hawtrey Charters. We realize how they are important to each other when Charters thinks he has killed Caldicott by accident (but he hasn’t). His traumatized face tells us a lot about how he regrets it. Poor Charters! And also, one of my favourite things about this film is the fact that Caldicott is in love! Not with Charter’s sister, but with the beautiful exotic dancer La Palermo (Greta Gynt). He’s too adorable when he smiles too her, hypnotized. And it’s in Crook’s Tour that we’ll see the only Caldicott’s on-screen kiss. So, Charters and Caldicott actually have feelings and can also be in love with girls and not only with cricket! Finally, in Millions Like Us, we learn that Caldicott has a wife, but we don’t really know who it is. Could it be La Palermo???

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Caldicott in love!
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Noel Hood as Edith Charters
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Greta Gynt as La Palermo

 

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Charters and Caldicott are one of the best examples of what best friends are. Always, calling each other “old man”, they do not only have very connective personalities, but always seems to get along well. We indeed never or rarely see them angry at each other. They are perfect travelling companions and their complicity is contagious.

The Lady Vanishes, Night Train to Munich, Crook’s Tour and Millions Like Us certainly wouldn’t have been the same without their presence. They form one of the most appreciable duos of the British screen. Of course, their interprets were brilliant too. Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne built those unique personalities and gave them the perfect essence to become first class characters.

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Charters and Caldicott simply are the proof that two ordinary English gentlemen can become some of the most interesting characters in a film.

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I would like to thank Moon in Gemini for hosting this fun blogathon! It was a perfect occasion for me to finally watch Crook’s Tour and Millions Like Us that I had never seen before. The Charters and Caldicott’s films are all brilliant in their own way.

Don’t forget to read the other entries!

You Gotta Have Friends Blogathon Day 1

You Gotta Have Friends Blogathon Day 2

You Gotta Have Friends Blogathon Day 3

See you!

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Fun picture of Nauton Wayne, Margaret Lockwood and Basil Radford on the set of Night Train to Munich
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Many Thanks from Me and Grace!

To my dear blogger friends,

I simply want to thank you for having participated to The 2nd Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon. It was a small one, but I enjoyed every moment of it and was impressed with all your articles!

Remember, without your participation, there would be no blogathon!

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I’m sure Grace Kelly would have been honoured by this marvellous tribute we gave her. Even if she’s no longer with us, we need to keep her memory alive!

If you didn’t get the chance to participate to the blogathon, I’ll make sure to host it again next year. 🙂

Of course, don’t forget to read all the great entries in you haven’t:

The 2nd Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon

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See you at the next blogathon, which should be announced on December 1, 2016. Patience! 😉

Life is a Circus in Trapeze

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It all started with Strauss’s The Beautiful Blue Danube… and a fatal plunge…

Trapeze is one of those movies made to hold your breath, to be at the edge of your seat and contempt the colourful world of the impressive circus. I’m writing on this film today for the At the Circus Blogathon hosted by Letícia from Crítica Retrô and Summer from Serendipitous Anachronism.

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I don’t do this often, but, as I haven’t seen many circus movies, I chose to review one I had never seen. But I knew Trapeze could only be a winner for me because:

1- It stars Burt Lancaster, my 5th favourite actor.

2- It stars Tony Curtis, an actor I’m appreciating more and more.

3- Seeing more Gina Lollobrigida movies is ok for me! Same for Katy Jurado (who is part of the last movie I reviewed: High Noon. I like the coincidence)

4- When I realized it was directed by Carol Reed, it grabbed my attention even more. Actually, if I’m not wrong, I think it’s the first American movie directed by Carol Reed that I see.

My verdict: not disappointed. Not one minute!

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A 1956’s Cinemascope film, Trapeze is an adaptation of the novel The Killing Frost by Max Catto. It won the Silver Bear for Best Actor (Burt Lancaster) and the Public Prize at the 6th Berlin International Film Festival, and Carol Reed received a nomination for Best Director at the Directors Guild of America.

The action takes place at the Bouglione Circus in Paris, trapeze artist Tino Orsini (Tony Curtis) has just arrived in town to meet the great Mike Ribble (Burt Lancaster), whom, he believes, is the only one who can teach him how to do a dangerous triple somersault. Ribble is first not interested in working with him. Years before, he got badly injured precisely doing a triple somersault that failed. He since has to walk with a stick. But Riddle admits to his friend Rosa (Katy Jurado) that Orsini has talent. He finally accepts to create an act with him and to teach him the triple. Things go fine and the two men work well together until Lola (Gina Lollobrigida) imposes herself to be part of the act. Bouglione ( Thomas Gomez) put pressures on all of them, believing the important thing for his circus is the money and the public, not so much the quality of the acts. Then starts a series of manipulations and the formation of an inevitable love triangle.

I remember I was once having a conversation with my grandfather about old actors and he asked me if I liked Burt Lancaster. Of course! And then he wanted to know if I had seen Trapeze. But I had not. I think it’s not long after that Summer and Letícia announced their blogathon, so I thought it was the perfect occasion to see it!

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Burt Lancaster couldn’t have been better cast as Mike Riddle. You might know that, before breaking into movies, Mr. Lancaster first worked as an acrobat in the circus world. That’s where he met his longtime friend Nick Cravat. Unfortunately, after having been badly injured, Lancaster had to renounce to the circus life. After having served in the army, he became a movie star. His first movie was The Killers.

Burt the acrobat!

Burt Lancaster has always been athletic. Except for performing acrobatics in a circus, he also practiced Basket Ball, athletics, and gymnastic. Lancaster didn’t hesitate to use his skills and what he had learned from the circus in movies such as The Flame and the Arrow, The Crimson Pirate and, of course, Trapeze. Lancaster was a performer on many levels.

Interestingly enough, I even read that Lancaster used to ask for a high bar set up on sets and locations so he could perform acrobatics and stay in shape. (IMDB) Well, we all have noticed what a great body he had!

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From The Rose Tattoo

So, Burt was meant to play in Trapeze. Because of his experience, the actor could perform all his trapeze stunts by himself. The only part that is not performed by Lancaster himself is this famous triple somersault. Lancaster first wanted to do it, but technical adviser Eddie Ward thought it would be best for him to double him for the dangerous stunts. Ward was eventually replaced by Nick Cravat for the final stunt. Well, even if we don’t see Burt doing the famous triple somersault, we still can see him performing as an acrobat and that’s a delight.

Burt doesn’t only impress with his athleticism, but also for his performance. As always, he is full of charisma and dynamism. He transmits his intention in many ways. On that trapeze, but also on the ground when, with his majestical face and his impressive manners.

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Trapeze certainly was Burt’s film (he also produced it), but Tony Curtis is a revelation too. Unlike Burt Lancaster, this one hadn’t worked in a circus before, but he had the stature to be convincing in the role. We also have to remember that this is not only a circus show, but also a movie with a story. Curtis was believable and I have to say I much enjoyed his performance.

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Gina Lollobrigida didn’t impress me much. She was beautiful, of course. She was ok, but I was more mesmerized by Katy Jurado’s acting. If Lollobrigida is a bit plain, Jurado gives a touching performance and can easily be a favourite. Yes, she has the beautiful role, but that’s not the point. The fact that Lollobrigida’s acting wasn’t wonderful enough created a sort of ambiguity and, to be honest, I can really say what I think of her character, precisely because of that. Sadly, the stunt woman for Gina Lollobrigida died after an accident on the set.

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We also have to give credit to Johnny Puleo, who plays Max. He is one of those supporting actors that is just so fun to watch. He adds a little something to the film and is nothing but appreciable.

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Trapeze is a movie I liked, not necessarily for the story. On this subject, I really enjoyed the first part involving Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis preparing their duo. But as soon as Gina Lollobrigida gets involved, things were a bit spoiled. That love triangle surely adds a plot element to the story. But it’s not what we like most about the movie. It’s this kind of love triangle that is here for no real reasons except entertain us a bit. That creates another problem for the film, a little hic. We can’t deny that Trapeze is a bit misogynist. I mean, all the problems seem to be created by the women. Why? Are they so dangerous? Even Rosa (Katy Jurado), a good and humble person, is accused of being the cause of a horse’s death. Luckily, Lollobrigida’s character evolves for the best and she sorts of become a more sensible person at the end.

No, Trapeze, except for Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis’s brilliant performances, impresses for its visual dimension. I mean, a circus movie has to be that way. First, it’s so colourful. I think that seeing this movie on the big screen would be an unforgettable experience. It’s a majestic rainbow that simply makes you want to go to the circus. To this colour is added the traditional circus music and we became part of the public. The camera angles were also brilliantly chosen and allowed us to have different views on the trapeze artists. The wide shot and the great wide shots allow us to have a great ensemble view on the performers, see their pirouettes and their teamwork. While the closer shots allow us to see important details such as Burt Lancaster and Gina Lollobirgida’s kiss in the hair or Burt Lancaster’s hands dropping the hands of his partner and causing his fatal plunge. The mix of low and high angles is also well welcomed and adds even more dynamism to the film. I have to see, the editing and the cinematography are among the most brilliant elements of Trapeze.

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Trapeze remains a very authentic film for the reason that it was shot on location. Well, somehow. It takes place in Paris and it was filmed in Paris. We don’t see the Eiffel Tower or the Arch of Triumph, but the artistic life of the city, the more underground part of it. But one thing is sure, Paris is lovely everywhere. The exterior scenes were filmed at the Cirque d’Hiver, which real life proprietor was Joseph Bouglione. The interior scenes were filmed at the Studios de Billancourt (Hauts-de-Seine). The studios are not at the center of Paris, but not so far from it.

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The Cirque d’Hiver in Paris

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Finally, what makes this film a perfect circus movie is the fact that the world of the circus is omnipresent. I mean, people are performing all the time! I love this moment when Tony Curtis follows Burt Lancaster (who is not one bit interested in him) and wants to show him what he can do. He starts doing acrobatics around him in the street and that makes him just so lovable. Then, when Lancaster finally agrees to speak to him, he starts walking on his hands. Lancaster joins him and then, there those two men discussing business while walking on their hands as if it was something perfectly normal! Of course, we all do that in real life hahaha! But this adds a very appreciable comic side to the movie.

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Trapeze is one of those movies that makes you want to go to the circus. Just like when I go to the real life circus, I was very stressed for the performers when I was watching the film and hoped for nothing bad to happen to them. It might not be perfect on the narrative level, but for its main composition, it’s a film that remains highly entertaining. Anyway, I greatly enjoyed it and it fulfilled my expectations in a good way.

I want to thank Critica Retrô and Serendipitous Anachronism for hosting this colourful blogathon! Talking about circus movie certainly was something I’m sure not many people had thought of and it was a most rewarding experience! It even gave me an idea for next’s year subject, if the blogathon is hosted again!

Don’t forget to take a look at the other entries:

At the Circus Blogathon

See you!

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The Strong and Quiet Amy Kane: Grace Kelly in High Noon

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High Noon. Ah! This film that I first knew as its French title: Le train sifflera trois fois.
For those who are reading my blog of a long time, you probably know that High Noon is one of the films that made me discover classics, but also the film that made me discover Grace Kelly (and, as a matter of fact, Gary Cooper too). It’s also my favourite western. Why? We’ll come back to that later.
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Today, I’m hosting the 2nd Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon. For my contribution, I’ve decided to write about High Noon, because, well, it was about time!
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High Noon was directed by Fred Zinnemann (From Here to EternityOklahoma!A Man of all Seasons) and produced by Stanley Kramer. Carl Foreman wrote the script and Dimitri Tiomkin wrote the music. The film stars Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly, Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado, Thomas Mitchell, Lon Chaney Jr, Otto Kruger, Lee Van Cleef (his first role, a silent one), Ian MacDonald, Sheb Wooley and Robert J. Wilke.
Released in 1952 and winner of four Oscars (including Best Actor for Gary Cooper), and three nominations (Best Film, Best Director, Best Screenplay), High Noon remains one of those timeless classics. For its brilliant composition, it’s one of the “old movies” that can be appreciated by many generations.
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On the set
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High Noon is a very “simple” western. No Indian chases here and no big countries. All the action takes place in a little town of New Mexico, Hadleyville. Will Kane (Gary Cooper), the town marshall, just get married to Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly), a young Quaker girl. A newly wed man, Kane is about to give us his profession and be replaced by a new marshal. But as soon as the wedding ceremony is over, the railway station man comes in a hurry to inform them that the notoriously terrible Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) is arriving by the noon train. His brother Ben Miller (Sheb Wooley) and his acolytes Jack Colby (Lee Van Cleef) and Jim Pierce (Robert J. Wilke) are waiting for him at the station. Kane had once arrested Miller for murder and this one was to be executed, but things changed and he wasn’t. People suspect that he is back to take revenge on Kane. So, they hurry him to live with Amy. On his way, Kane feels responsible for the protection of the town and decides to go back. Things don’t go too well for him as, Amy, a pacifist, tells him she’ll leave by the noon train if he doesn’t leave the town with her. Plus, Kane looks for people to help him confront Frank Miller, but nobody seems to have the courage to take such a risk.

 

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High Noon is my favourite Western because it’s more than just an ordinary Western. The performances are ace and the visual dimension, is yet, simple, but also very impressive.
But let’s start with Grace Kelly, who is our main subject today. High Noon was Grace’s second film and her first important role. Even if it still was not a leading role, it was more important than the one she had in 14 Hours (Henry Hathaway, 19510. Anyway. Grace Kelly’s role in High Noon has always been one of my favourites of hers. As a matter of fact, it might be my favourite one. The main reason why is that Grace is so humble in this film. We know she had mostly played high society ladies, beautiful, clever, perfect. Too perfect. I love her in Rear Window and To Catch a Thief of course, but I find it difficult to identify with these classy characters. But Amy is more an ordinary girl. She has great values, she is simple (in a good way) and courageous too. She also has such a kind face and inspires confidence. Amy Kane was the innocent and sweet Grace Kelly, the pre-Hitchcockian cool blond. Grace also was only 21 when she starred in that film, my age, so it’s another reason for me to feel close to her!
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For a second film, Grace Kelly gives quite a convincing performance. She is maybe not as much at ease as in Rear Window or maybe not as much poignant as in The Country Girl, but she still impresses us. I always remember this wedding scene at the beginning. Grace seems so angelic with her beautiful big eyes. Just the ultimate definition of the word adorable. Even if she first plays the calm girl, she manages to surprise us when she confronts Will Kane in his decision of staying at Hadleyville to face Frank Miller and his gang. I love this moment when she says to Gary Cooper (Kane) “Don’t try to be a hero! You don’t have to be a hero! Not for me!” There’s so much emotion in her voice, so much power. We almost believe she will convince Will to stay, but she, unfortunately, doesn’t.
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It might not be obvious at first, but Grace also portrays a woman who is strong and independent. Some people might think that she abandons her husband by deciding to leave on the noon train. Maybe, but it also shows us that she makes decisions for herself. Then, [spoiler] at the end, when she finally decides to leave the train and go find her husband in the fight, she becomes the second heroine and proves us her great love for her new husband and her courage to do something she will normally not do: kill. [end of spoiler].
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This scene between Grace and Katy Jurado, who plays Helen Ramírez, Kane and Miller’s ex-girlfriend, is a delight. Because it shows us a strong opposition between the woman of character (Helen) and the woman of values (Amy). Due to Helen and Will pasts, we are afraid the two ladies might not stand each other, but, on the contrary, we realize they kind of complete each other. We may also say that it’s thanks to Helen if Amy finally decides to help her husband. She makes her understand that she has to fight for her man if she loves him. For her clever performance as Helen Ramírez, Katy Jurado won a Golden Globe Award.
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Grace was not happy with her performance and said about it that she was too wooden, but Fred Zinnemann found positivism in this and claimed that Grace’s lack of experience as an actress combined to, yes, he had to admit, the fact that she was a bit wooden only made her character more adorable and more touching. It was perhaps the perfect type of acting for someone like Amy Kane.
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I have a great collection of Grace Kelly’s pictures and some of my favourite are these shots that were taken on the set of the film:
It has often been said that Gary Cooper was too old for Grace Kelly. Yes, it’s true. She was 21 and he was around 50. There’s a big age difference, but, due to the fact that I love Gary Cooper, I don’t mind much. As a matter of fact, I think Grace and him look good together. They’re a beautiful chemistry between them (one of my favourite moments is, at the end, [spoiler] when they hug each other after Miller’s death [end of spoiler]. There’s so much tenderness, so much beauty in this moment. Younger actors such as Gregory Peck, Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Charlton Heston were also listed for the role, but, to be honest, I couldn’t imagine someone else than Gary Cooper as Will Kane. The film simply BELONG to him. It’s, in my opinion, his best performance, and there’s no surprise he won his second Oscar for it. His acting game is full of subtlety and full of honesty. Kane AND Gary Cooper are simply heroes in this film. For once, I have to say, no supporting actors surpass the main one.
The rest of the cast is marvellous too, but I’d like to focus on other aspects of the film now.
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Something I’ve always loved about High Noon is how the music and the image share the film space so well. To me, this film is like a big choreography. I couldn’t imagine High Noon without “Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin'” or without Dimitri Tiomkins’s glorious, suspenseful and memorable score. It’s a must to the film and it reflects so well its atmosphere.
My favourite moment, precisely due to the image and the music, might be the opening. I mean, when I was watching the film yesterday, I just started it over three times because I just love it. We star hearing Tex Ritter singing “Do Not Forsake me” and the first actor we see is Lee Van Cleef. He advances toward the camera with style and his unique look. Even if he has a small part in the film, this moment glorifies him for sure. Then, Sheb Wooley and Robert J. Wilke arrive and add even more magnificence to this scene.
Dimitri Tiomkin’s score certainly is in all its glory during all the film, especially in this scene which is another of my favourites:
It’s no wonder why High Noon won the Oscar for best editing. This one plays with the multiple possibilities and creates a great dynamism in a film that, first, remains quite simple. The camera shots are perfectly chosen to convince our eyes and make this film unforgettable.
High Noon was filmed in a way to give power to everybody. Everybody seems to count in this film, even if their role is a minor one (remember what I previously said about Lee Van Cleef). Some of my favourite shots are the one when Grace and Kane leave in their carriage. They are filmed in a low angle shot and they look so noble. I love it.
I’m also quite a fan of most shots that include Lee Van Cleef. I mean, he has the most amazing close ups:
Grace Kelly also has her moment of prestige with well-chosen close-ups, which apparently made Katy Jurado a bit jealous.
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The film also presents some amazing aerial shots, such as this one that accentuates the fact that Kane is now all alone. Look at the beginning of this clip:
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High Noon is not a traditional western as it was much more based on good morals than “bang bang” and “cowboy vs Indians”. I have to say, I’ve never really liked it when Indians are the bad ones in Western, because, first it’s racist and, second, it’s not representative of the reality. But that’s another story! High Noon manages to escape with grace from these prejudices. The film is also known to be a symbolic opposition against the blacklisting and  McCarthyism there was at the time. John Wayne saw it as the most un-American thing he has never seen. Fred Zinnemann said of High Noon that it was “a story about a man’s conflict of conscience.”
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High Noon‘s screenwriter Carl Foreman was blacklisted during the Maccartysme area. Sadly enough, screenwriters seemed to have been the scapegoats of the Maccartysme…
His script remains memorable for the glorification of the individual, glorified with the words, and the values he shares so well with us.
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Carl Foreman
As I often like to do it, here are some of my favourite quotes of the film:
1- Helen (to Harvey) : You’re a good-looking boy: you’ve big, broad shoulders. But he’s a man. And it takes more than big, broad shoulders to make a man.

2-  Helen: What kind of woman are you? How can you leave him like this? Does the sound of guns frighten you that much?Amy: I’ve heard guns. My father and my brother were killed by guns. They were on the right side but that didn’t help them any when the shooting started. My brother was nineteen. I watched him die. That’s when I became a Quaker. I don’t care who’s right or who’s wrong. There’s got to be some better way for people to live. Will knows how I feel about it.

3- Helen: Kane will be a dead man in half an hour and nobody’s gonna do anything about it. And when he dies, this town dies too. I can feel it. I am all alone in the world. I have to make a living. So I’m going someplace else. That’s all.

4- Amy: Don’t try to be a hero! You don’t have to be a hero, not for me!

5- Will [on staying in the town, facing Frank Miller]: I’ve got to, that’s the whole thing.

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High Noon is a movie full of good values and it presents us a good life lesson at the end. Simply, that people are sometimes weak and don’t deserve what is done for them. It’s pretty clear when [Spoiler] Will and Amy leaves the town without saying a word to anybody. Will just saved them from Miller, alone. Nobody wanted to help him. He throws his marshal star on the ground and leaves a hero, but a bitter hero. [end of spoiler]
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High Noon was often described as  “a western for people who don’t like westerns”. (IMDB) I think it’s true. For all the reasons I’ve previously said. This film is one of a kind and almost belongs to a separate category. It is also known to be a “Noir Western”.
It’s a film that will always have a special place in my heart, and writing about it was nothing but a good experience.
Other fellow bloggers have honoured Grace Kelly and her films with their contributions to the 2nd Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon. I invite you to take a look at them here.
Before I leave you, all I can say is happy heavenly birthday dear Grace Kelly!
She left us too soon, but her memory will always be honoured.
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Top of the World: 9 Leo DiCaprio Films

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Just… too adorable ahah ❤

Today, one of my very favourite modern actors, the one and only Leonardo DiCaprio, turned 42! Young and still full of talents!

For the occasion, I’m presenting you my top 9 of my favourite movies of his! Why 9? Sounds a bit odd I know, but the simple reason is that I’ve seen 11 of his films, and there’s two of them that I didn’t really like, so I don’t see the use of including them in the top! It was The Revenant and The Great Gatsby. Leo is not the reasons why I didn’t like those movies! More like just the movie itself…

Of course, these are my personal choices and just list my own favourites. 🙂 Don’t hesitate to share your choices with me!

Ok, here we go:

9. The Departed (Martin Scorsese, 2006)

Quite a cast.

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8. Inception (Christopher Nolan, 2010)

Not sure I understood everything, but despite that I liked it!

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7. The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013)

A bit long and a bit too much, but overall I appreciated it.

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6. Shutter Island (Martin Scorsese, 2010)

Weird film, but one you don’t forget!

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5. Django Unchained (Quentin Tarantino, 2012)

Normally not a fan of Tarantino’s films, but I exceptionally loved this one. Leo is delightfully evil!

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4. Catch Me if You Can (Steven Spielberg, 2002)

Gotta love Spielberg 🙂

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3. The Aviator (Martin Scorsese, 2004)

IMHO, what the best DiCaprio-Scorsese’s collaboration

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2. Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)

Well, a  Leo DiCaprio’s top without this guilty pleasure wouldn’t be a real one. Anyway, I love this film, find it entertaining and Jack is such a cool character 🙂

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Suspense….

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More suspense….

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  1. What’s Eating Gilbert Grape! (Lasse Hallström, 1993)

I think it’s for this film or The Aviator that Leo should have won his first Oscar! Gilbert Grape is a delightful film. Love it.

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Hope you appreciated the top!

Happy birthday Leo! 🙂

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