Irish Film Studies: Odd Man Out

This semester, I’m attending a course on Irish cinema. Each week, we are expected to write a blog-like journal about the film we watched in class and/or our class discussion about the film. I’ve decided to include those entries to my blog, so it would be more agreeable to read than a Word document. This was my journal entry on The Third Man (week 3)

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Carol Reed’s Odd Man Out was on my long “to watch” list since I read a review of it written by one of my fellow bloggers. Film noir + James Mason + Carol Reed = what seemed to be for me a perfect combination. And it was! I didn’t remember the film was taking place in Northern Ireland, but I guess it was a good thing as it finally created a context (this course) for me to watch it.

To visualize some clips from The Third Man (with Joseph Cotten – I LOVE this actor) was quite relevant as an “introduction” to Odd Man Out. Personally, this brought back good memories of when I was in Vienna with my friend this summer: when we visited Prater (where there is the famous big wheel) and when we spent an afternoon with a friend of mine, Paul Henreid’s grandson, who showed us the famous “Third Man door” where, if my memory doesn’t fail me, Harry Lime makes his first appearance.

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Me, in front of the famous door!

But, aside from bringing back good memories, watching the clips allowed us to make a great comparison with the cinematography of this film and Odd Man Out’s one. Being two noirs, I believed this element is the one that is the most similar from one film to another. For example, the night scenes of a city, showed with a lot of contrasts and shadows, wet streets and dark corners, seem to be recurrent in both films, as well as in film noir in general. In both films there is this mysterious and oppressing ambiance created by all this darkness and complex characters as well.

It’s interesting, because each time I watch a Carol Reed’s film, I can feel I am watching a Carol Reed’s film, even if some of them are very different. For example, my favourite one, A Girl Must Live, a comedy starring Carol Reed’s fetish actress, Margaret Lockwood, obviously has nothing to do with Odd Man Out, but somehow there is something in both films that tells me that it is a Carol Reed’s film. What it is? I can’t quite say. Is it due to the fact that they are British films? Because those are so different from American films, especially classic British films. I don’t know. Of course, it’s easier to do the comparison between Odd Man Out and The Third Man, as they are both film noirs.

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Margaret Lockwood, Renée Houston and Lilli Palmer in A Girl Must Live (1939)

Odd Man Out is not about the green Ireland that we saw in the following movie: The Quiet Man, but this is indeed a way to show us different aspects of Ireland’s life. While James Mason was not an Irish actor, I believe he did an interesting and convincing job. The co-actress, Kathleen Ryan (who was Irish), made me think so much of Patricia Roc, whom I could have perfectly imagined in this role as well (although she was British). The two makes a sad pair and perhaps represent the most tragic aspects of the film, the failure of the man character. Of course, there are many more to discuss about Odd Man Out, but I’ll stop here for the moment.

Kathleen-Ryan-and-James-Mason-in-Odd-Man-Out

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Words: 521

Images sources:

“A Girl Must Live.” Silver Sirens, n.d, https://www.silversirens.co.uk/films/girl-must-live-1939/.

“Carol Reed’s Coded IRA Drama Odd Man Out Has the Look but not the Feel of Noir.” A.V. Club, Apr. 15, 2015, http://www.avclub.com/review/carol-reeds-coded-ira-drama-odd-man-out-has-look-n-217923

“Happy St. Pat’s! ‘Odd Man Out’ by Carol Reed Is a Great Irish Drama and a Great Thriller.” Film Noir Blonde, Mar. 15, 2016, http://www.filmnoirblonde.com/happy-st-pats-odd-man-out-by-carol-reed-is-a-great-irish-drama-and-a-great-thriller/.

“Odd Man Out.” Film Forum, n.d, http://filmforum.org/film/odd-man-out-reed-trilogy.

“The Third Man, 1949.” Little White Lies, Jun. 25, 2015, http://lwlies.com/reviews/third-man-1949/.

 

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