In Honour of Joan Fontaine on her Heavenly Centenary

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Do you remember the first time you ever heard about the more than extraordinary Joan Fontaine? I do as if it was yesterday. I was looking at this book called Les Stars de cinema that I had bought for my own curiosity (I was 15 and yet not really familiar with classic movie stars, but I thought the pictures were beautiful) and came across this picture of Joan Fontaine. I thought she was simply gorgeous, and even if I didn’t immediately watch one of her films, I stayed forever fascinated by this photo.

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The book mentioned the film Rebecca and since I had always been curious to see more Hitchcock’s film, it obviously was quite high on my to-see list. However, the first Joan Fontaine’s film I saw was Suspicion (also directed by Hitchcock) for which she won the Best Actress Oscar in 1941 (she is the only actress who won an Oscar for a Hitchcock’s film). And then, I watched Rebecca. Two films were enough for her to become one of my favourite actresses. I was charmed by her softness, which is present in her smooth voice, her kind gaze and her her skillful ways. When I watched Suspicion for the first time, I was with my mother who also agreed that her performance was brilliant. She made an observation that I think defines perfectly Joan’s talent: she is able to change emotions very easily.

When I discovered Joan, one thing I found quite nice about her is the fact that she was still alive. That was something rare enough as most of the great classic movie stars are now dead. But, unfortunately, as I was thinking for the x time on how it would be nice (and impossible) to meet her, I read a fatal Facebook post announcing her death. That made me very sad and I didn’t sleep a lot that night. Poor Joan, she can’t be gone forever! December 15, 2013 was metaphorically a very cold day.

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Photo taken in the late 70s: proof that she aged very gracefully!

Another of Joan’s talents is the fact that she was always able to give the right essence to her characters, her performances. For this reason, I cannot think of a role where she was miscast. She often plays gentle and innocent dames, but movies like Ivy and Born to Be Bad are a proof that she could also play fascinating villain without, however, losing her charm and by staying faithful to herself.

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If Joan is often associated with one of Daphné Du Maurier’s most famous characters, many will agree that she was also the perfect Jane Eyre. Indeed, I can hardly imagine someone else than her for the role. The only problem might be that Jane is described as someone plain, but Joan certainly wasn’t!

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Poor Jane, alone in the fog

If we continue to discuss her movie roles and how talented she was in their execution, one thing that always fascinated me is how she was able to play teenage girls and be convincing. Indeed, in The Constance Nymph, Joan was 26 when she played the role of the young Tessa and 30 when she played the role of Lisa in Letter from an Unknown Woman. Here, her acting is convincing both as a teenager and an elegant lady. It’s perhaps the innocence that she embodied that made it easy for her to play these roles.

When we hear Joan’s voice narrating the film at the beginning of Rebecca, we are enchanted by this sweet melody. She had a voice that inspired calm and serenity and one of these movie star voices that I could recognize everywhere. I love the way she talks, with an incredible fluidity. I could listen to her all day, even if she was reading the back of a cereal box. The tenderness in her gaze is also something absolutely seducing about Joan. One of the best examples would be this scene in September Affair when she and Joseph Cotten listen to September Song sang by Walter Huston on the radio. The way she looks at Joseph, with nothing but love in her eyes, creates one of the most beautiful scenes of the film.

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In another tribute I wrote to her, I explained that what I liked the most about Joan, and this time, Joan the woman and not Joan the actress, was her sense of humour. Indeed, this one can easily be seized in her interviews. Even if she didn’t give many of those, her ease was admirable. One can only smile when listening to her laugh and stories. By embodying my favourite quality ever (sense of humour), Joan only gains my sympathy and make me regret I could never be one of her friends. But, she remains a friend at heart and a precious spiritual companion for all those who love her.

There is also this video of an amazing meeting between Joan and another of my idols: Doris Day. The circumstances were indeed perfect for them to meet: Both love/loved animals and live/lived in Carmel.

Joan the woman can also be admired for a multitude of other reasons. Indeed, apart from being a gifted actress, she also was a talented cook, a licensed pilot, an expert rider, a licensed interior decorator and certainly a clever woman: at the age of 3, she scored no less than 160 on an IQ test! (IMDB)

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With her first husband, actor Brian Aherne

In 2015, I read Joan’s autobiography No Bed Of Roses where she tells her fascinating story. However, I think I should read it again as, at the time, I was still not used to reading long books in English and probably missed a few things. the nicest thing about this book is that it has Joan’s autograph inside of it! She didn’t autograph it for me, but just to think that she held this book is quite satisfying. One thing that particularly marked me about her life story is when she tells how she met Evita Peron (who thought they looked alike). Can anyone find a picture of them together??

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To this day, I have seen a total of 21 Joan’s films. This is quite good I think, but not even half of her filmography! So, of course, there are much more I have to discover. So far, the ones I’ve seen are Rebecca, Suspicion, Gunga Din, The Women, This Above All, The Constant Nymph, Jane Eyre, The Affairs of Susan, Letter from an Unknown Woman, The Emperor Waltz, You Gotta Stay Happy, Kiss The Blood Off My Hands, September Affair, Something to Live For, The Bigamist, Beyond a Reasonable Doubt, Island in the Sun, Until They Sail, Ivy, Born to Be Bad and Darling, How Could You! For various reasons, I’ll recommend them all, but I’ll also be curious to know which one you think I should watch next!

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That awesome haircut! Joan was like the David Lynch of the actresses!

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It is not surprising that a rose was named after Joan Fontaine because this is really what she was, a true rose who embellishes our screens and seduces us forever. Today, this great lady would have had the honourable age of 100. Unfortunately, she didn’t have her sister’s Olivia de Havilland magic potion and already left us for a different world, but her memory is with us forever.

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Happy heavenly birthday dear Joan!

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This post was part of the Joan Fontaine Centenary Blogathon, hosted by me (!) and Crystal at In The Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood. Make sure to read the other wonderful entries:

The Joan Fontaine Centenary Blogathon

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I’ll leave you with this video tribute to Joan that I edited in…2014! Time flies!

See you!

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10 Things I Love and Hate About Movie Blogging

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I had the idea of doing this yesterday. Because I feel like complaining, I guess, here are five things I hate about movie blogging (or blogging in general), but because I’m also addicted to blogging, here are also five things I love about it. There isn’t any real purpose to that, but I’m sure some of you can relate to some of these things, and it’s been a long time since I haven’t written something that wasn’t for a blogathon (aside from my numerous top lists).

Ok, here we go!

First, let’s get rid of the complaints…

FIVE THINGS I HATE

1- Summarize a film:

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Honestly, I never really liked that. While some bloggers describe the movie from A to Z in order to give and in-depth analysis of it (and that is perfectly fine),  the objective of my blog mostly is to explain why I love a movie and convince people to see it. So, obviously, I would not tell the whole story (but a few exceptions, if you look at my analysis of Marlon Brando’s character in The Men).  So, a small synopsis is in order. The problem comes when the movie is kind of complicated and I feel like I have to tell a lot, so people will understand what it is about, but, in a way, I don’t want to tell too much either. A real dilemma, but there are things worse than that in life!

2- When you work hard on an article, but nobody reads it

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I know, it’s impossible to read every blog article ever written, even I don’t do so! But I know we all feel a bit disappointed when, after working hours on an article and thinking it’s pretty good, we receive barely any comment or no like (because, yeah, I guess there are people who read the articles without commenting or liking them, but, at this point, they are a bit like ghosts). If you feel like there’s one of your articles that deserves more recognition, please share it in the comment section and it will be my pleasure to read it! Here is one of mine: A Patch of Blue: When One Sees With the Heart

3- Having a writer’s block

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This doesn’t often happen to me, but it sometimes does, most likely on blogathon seasons. I sometimes subscribe to a blogathon with some movie as a subject, but when the time comes to write about that film, well, I realise that, despite liking the movie, I haven’t much to write about it or I’m not motivated enough. This doesn’t happen often, but here is an example: When Cary Grant Became Invisible… Topper (1937). Luckily, we have the Buster Keaton Blogathon hosted by Lea from Silent-Ology: I always have a ton of things to say about Buster Keaton’s films!

4- Correcting

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While writing the article and choosing pictures for it is a real entertainment (otherwise I wouldn’t be blogging…), the correction always is the boring part. The main reason is the fact that English is my second language. Well, I’m going to an English university, so I’m obviously writing much more often in English than French now, but it still remains my second language and my French writing is still better than my English one. So, the job is obviously harder, especially with long texts. I try as much as possible to write articles without mistakes by using correcting tools and all this, but I know I’m missing a lot of them and it will probably be the case for this article too… And believe me, I do spend considerable time correcting.  I, by the way, want to thank most of my faithful readers for always having been indulgent on that level.

5- When Blogathons hosts don’t read your article

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Ok, it doesn’t make me as angry as Jack (!), but I guess it had to come out. If you host a blogathon, I think it’s your duty to read all the entries. It’s just common sense. Luckily, I rarely encountered such cases. By the way, if I have ever forgotten (because believe me, it would have been purely unintentional) to read one of the articles you submitted for one of my blogathons, please consider that I feel really bad about it, that I offer you my sincere apologies, that I’ll go hide myself with shame, and that I invite you to share the article in the comment section. 😉

FIVE THINGS I LOVE

1- “Meeting” people with whom I share common interests

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And that is movies. I put “meeting” in inverted commas because I mostly meet them through the internet and not really in real life. Well, I know some of you meet each other at the TCM Film Festival but, unfortunately, I never had the chance to attend it. However, I did meet Lara from Backlots when I was in San Francisco and Michaela from Love Letters To Old Hollywood when I was in Prague. It was pretty cool. Wouldn’t it be nice to do a big get-together one of these days? 😀

2- Finally write about what you like the way you want to

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Because Facebook is limited, there isn’t anything better than blogging to share your love of films. While I am studying films and have to write about them at school, there’s always a ton of restrictions that make the process never completely amusing. But, on the blogging platform, you are free! Free to write what you want, the way you want to. The worst you can get from it is a nasty comment or a spam, but you are freeee to delete them too! 🙂 Blogging is all about fun.

3- You discover movies and make people discover some too

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Well, I guess at one point discovering a new movie can be like “discovering” a new colour haha!

That’s what I really like about writing and reading: it’s an occasion for you to finally spread the word about a not too well-known film but that you think people should discover. As an example, I have this review of Give Us the Moon. I’m kind of a missionary for that film!

4- Blogathons

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And don’t forget to subscribe to my Ingrid Bergman Blogathon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love them because they are the perfect way to discover blogs and increase the popularity of your own. I think, without them, I would probably still just have 20 followers and I’m sure I’m not the only one! 😉 Blogathons are also a way to have ideas on what to write about. It creates material on your blog, which is always a good thing.

5- Good surprises:

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This is in relation to point #2 of the five things I hate. While it is always disappointing when nobody reads a text that you work hard on, I always find it amusing and touching when many appreciate an article that I thought wasn’t that extraordinary. Well, it is, of course, my pleasure if you liked it! As an example, I share this review of My Man Godfrey. I really don’t think it was that good, but I guess many disagreed. 🙂

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I’ll be curious to know your opinion about that and what are the things YOU love and hate about movie blogging! You can share them in the comments section or simply create a new post like I did. Of course, if you do so, please share the link with me in the comments section of this post!

See you! 🙂

I Fall for Fred Derry

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The Best Years of Our Lives (William Wyler, 1946) is, without a doubt, one of the best post-war movies that has been made in Hollywood. It’s touching, sad, beautiful, etc. This 9 Oscars winning picture has all the ingredients to be a favorite among classic film lovers. On my side, if Fredric March delivers my favorite Oscar-Winning performance by an actor in a leading role, it’s for Dana Andrew as Fred Derry that I’ve developed a real crush through the years. Today, forget about the cinematography, forget about the editing, forget about the music. We are here to focus on our imaginary love for Derry! Meow!

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This article is part of the Reel Infatuation Blogathon 2017 hosted by Ruth from Silver Screenings and Font & Frock. A way to finally cry over our impossible love for movie stars and movie characters. I had A LOT of options, but Fred Derry/Dana Andrews it is!

Reel Infatuation 2017

Before continuing, if you haven’t seen the movie and wish to know more what it’s all about, please click here. But, basically, it’s the story of three American soldiers going back home after the war and struggling with the challenges of a new life and a country that has changed a lot during their absence.

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So, Fred Derry is the first character to be introduced to us, in an airport (that’s an important precision to make since I’ve always enjoyed taking the plane. One point for Fred!). He wears his very chic army uniform that perfectly draws the line of his amazing body. He imposes himself in an impressive elegance.

When he later is on the plane to go home with his new friends, Al Stephenson (Fredric March) and Homer Parrish (Harold Russell), and making jokes with them, we can notice his absolutely cutie-pie smile that will make our heart melt. *Sigh. Plus, he seems to be one with a great sense of humour, which is a quality I always priories. I mean, what would be life without some laughs?!

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Later, when the three friends are reunited at Butch’s (Homer’s uncle’s bar), Fred makes the acquaintance of Al’s wife Milly (Myrna Loy) and his daughter Peggy (Teresa Wright). We immediately know that this one won’t leave him indifferent. Oh! How we’d like to be in her place, drinking a glass with him, very close from one to each other. Hey, they say their love is impossible since Fred is already married, but imagine how impossible it is for me! Ok, I have to give one point to Marie Derry, since she is played by Virginia Mayo. Virginia. Awesome name, isn’t it? 😉 But with my dark brown hair, I’m personally much more the Teresa Wright type. But I like doing the party like Marie. I guess I’m somehow a mix of both!

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At the end of their most entertaining evening/night at Butch’s, Fred once again does everything for me to want to go in the television screen and be on his side. First, when he gets out of the Stephenson’s car to go to Marie’s apartment, he always hurt his head on the car’s door frame. He’s like so cute and so clumsy! ❤ And he apologizes. Poor Fred! ❤ He shows a beautiful vulnerability that we love. Of course, just like Milly and Peggy, I too would have gotten out of the car and bring him home for the night (because it seems that Marie isn’t in here  to welcome him). But, I personally would be less resistant than Peggy on a certain point. When she puts him to bed and he takes her in his arms exclaiming “Peggy!” in an amusing way and she managed to liberate oneself quite rapidly saying “I’m not THAT Peggy”, that makes me think “Well, girl, if you’re not ‘THAT Peggy’, I would like to be her without problem.” Anyway, we later learn that his wife is a real b****, so I personally wouldn’t have felt sorry.

During the night, Fred once again breaks our heart when he has a nightmare. His tears simply make us want to take him in our arms and comfort him. Luckily, Peggy is once again here to take care of him. Because, yes, men can cry too!

Unlike Al who works at the bank, Fred doesn’t make a fortune. He works in the new department store, part time in the perfume section and part time in the ice cream bar. Ok, I have a confession to make: I LOVE ice cream. It’s like my favourite food ever. So, I certainly would have liked to have one prepared by Fred! I love this scene where he explains to Peggy how he used to be such a good soda jerk before the war. He seems very passionate by the thing!

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Finally, we have to give more points to Fred on 3 main occasions: 1- When he cooks dinner for him and Marie. Marie wants to go out, but they can’t as he is too poor. But hey, a man cooking dinner! That’s certainly not something we see often in classic films. Good initiative Fred! I tell you, he is a man to marry. 😉 [SPOILERS] 2- When he FINALLY kisses Peggy. Ok, they kind of regret it as he is married, but how I wish to be at Peggy’s place. He seems to be a very good kisser. Anybody can confirm? 😛 And 3- When he kisses Peggy again at Homer’s wedding, but this time there is no regrets since he and Marie are divorced. (YES!) [END OF SPOILERS]

So yeah, we have all the reasons to fall for Fred Derry, he is at the same time so handsome (that smile! that body!), but also so cute in his mannerisms. He’s also funny, but serious when it’s time to be. Dana Andrews certainly chose a great role for his career. Ok, he was around 37 when he starred in The Best Years of Our Lives, which is like 15 years older than me… Hey, it’s not THAT bad! A girl can dream anyway! Of course, I have a lot of competition against Peggy. Àlala…

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Before living you, I want to thank Silver Screenings and Font & Frock for hosting this most original blogathon! We never take enough times to talk about our movie crushes!

To read the other entries, click on the following links

Reel Infatuation Blogathon 2017- Day 1

Reel Infatuation Blogathon 2017- Day 2

Reel Infatuation Blogathon 2017- Day 3

See you!

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My Favourite Golden Holden Moments

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As I told you during last year’s edition of the Golden Boy Blogathon, William Holden is an actor I snub for a much too long time, and he finally became my 2nd favourite actor (behind James Stewart). In the text tribute I wrote in his honour, I explained how he became one of my most favourite actors, why I love him, etc. Today, in honour of what would have been his 99th birthday, I wanted to do something similar, but different of course. I didn’t really feel like doing a movie review or focus on only one of William Holden’s performances. So, I thought it would be fun to present you my favourite William Holden movie moments! I once thought of doing this with my favourite movie moments in general, but this was too difficult. So, why not focus on a more precise subject? Why not William Holden? These are all movies moments that make me love and admire our Golden Boy more and more. Moments that make me recognize, not only his talent but that also make me be fond of him and realize how he can be so appreciated. Moments that makes him one of a kind. In other words, these will be various. It could be funny, sad, serious moment, it doesn’t really matter.
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I’ll present these in chronological order (according to the movie) and will try as much as possible to give an explanation to why each of these moments is a favourite.
By the way, I prefer calling them “moments” instead of “scenes” because these can last only a few seconds.
Ok, here we go!
Golden Boy ( Rouben Mamoulian, 1939)
His first entrance: When our Golden Boy first put the foot on the imaginary side of the movie industry. Well, not exactly has he had minor roles in two other films before but was uncredited. Anyway, that was the first time we were seeing him in a way to remember. The William Holden of Golden Boy was young, only 21, with an innocent look on his face and curly hair. What I absolutely love about this entrance is that it is a very spontaneous one. He interrupts Barbara Stanwyck and Adolf Menjou, who are about to kiss each other, by entering in the room in quite an energetic way. A remarkable entrance indeed!
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When he plays the violin: I love these moments (because there are more than one) because he expresses a beautiful vulnerability that we often find in some of his early roles. There’s a lot of sensibility in him and we can feel the emotions through his closed eyes.
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Every time he says “papa”:  Well, I just think that’s sweet. It makes a change from the usual “daddy”, “dad”, “father”, etc. I call my dad papa! (Well, I’m francophone so it’s normal). It’s also a good way to show the Italian blood of his character. Oh, and that’s one thing I like about Joe Bonaparte, because I have Italian blood too!
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When they sing “Funiculi Funicula” : Ok, that’s not only a “William Holden moment” as it involves all his family in the film, plus Barbara Stanwyck, but it’s one that I couldn’t overlook because it’s so much fun! Despite Golden Boy being a drama, it contains its moments of joy like this one where Lorna Moon (Barbara Stanwyck) is invited in Joe’s Italian family for supper. After eating, they decide to play music and joyfully sing “Funiculi Funicula”. You really wish you were here with them because they seem to have a really great time!
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Our Town (Sam Wood, 1940)
When he cries… : In this scene, George (William Holden)’s father tells him that his mother had to chop wood because he forgot to. Full of remorse, he starts to cry quietly. Poor Bill! 😥 This is both a sad and beautiful scene as it shows the vulnerability of his character and proves us that men can cry too! And they have the right to!
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The Remarkable Andrew (Stuart Heisler, 1942)
When he does his morning exercise at the beginning of the film: this scene makes me laugh so much. He’s just so adorable and funny, especially when he jumps around the room like a frog. Hahaha! He also does some weird sounds with his mouth, which makes the thing even more hilarious than it already is.
Just look at the beginning of this clip for this scene!
When Andrew Jackson asks him for a drink and he offers him some grape juice:
Ok, I didn’t remember this scene much, because I haven’t seen the film for a long time, but I read about it in my old William Holden Marathon article. Well, it goes without saying that this is completely adorable. William Holden was so young then!
You’ll find the moment in this clip from 3: 20 to 4: 08
Dear Ruth (William D. Russell, 1947)
Every time he kisses Joan Caulfield spontaneously :  This film certainly is the funniest of Holden’s films (in my opinion). He is so in love with Ruth (Caulfield) that his best way to express it is by kissing her all the times, everywhere. This gives us some hilarious moments and we certainly wished we could exchange places with Caulfield. 😉
I, unfortunately, couldn’t find a clip or a picture from these precise kissing moments, so here is a photo of them together.
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Father is a Bachelor (Abby Berlin and Norma Foster, 1950)
When he sings : Unfortunately, his voice was doubled (which is kind of odd, since I’ve been told that he had a fine singing voice), but, despite that, it remains something delightful. We don’t often see a “musical” Holden so that certainly is our chance. The singing moments are joyful ones and make this film the perfect family movie!
When he smiles to the old maid he is supposed to marry (not a very enthusiatic smile) : Toward the end of the film, he is supposed to marry one of the Cassin sisters in order to keep the poor Chalotte children under his guardianship. To determine which lady will marry him, they play a game of cricket. When Adealine wins, the smiles that Johnny (Holden) gives her is so forced and mixed with disgust that it automatically makes you burst into laughs. And it’s meant to as this film is a comedy! Believe it or not, Bill’s smiles are not always charming ones. 😉
When he makes a dress for May : By accident, Johnny burns little May’s dress. To fix his mess, he decides to confection one himself. He pretends he can, but that’s obviously untrue! The creating process, as well as the results, are pretty catastrophic and amusing. Poor May! Luckily, Johnny eventually manages to obtain a real pretty dress.
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Sunset Blvd (Billy Wilder, 1950)
When he kisses Nancy Olson on the nose: What I like about the scenes between Holden and Olson in this film is that, just like this one proves it, they are so sweet and simple. A kiss on the nose! Can you think of something lovelier?
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When he and Nancy are being theatrical “life!… can be beautiful”: In this false theatrical moment, Betty (Olson) and Joe (Holden) seem to be playing a scene from one of Joe’s films (but we are not 100 % sure). The theatricality is so intentionally exaggerated that it makes us feel the fun that these two can have together. I obviously think that Nancy Olson was one of the actresses with whom Bill had the best on-screen chemistry.
When he interrupts Max who is playing organ: Joe is angry in this scene as his luggage have been moved to his guest room (and he has NO intention to stay). He goes downstairs to ask Max (Erich von Stroheim) who did. This one is playing organ very loudly (what a pleasant way to be awake (!)). What I like about this scene is when he tells him  “Hey you! Max, whatever your name is.” This pretty much sums up his anger and the esteem he has for Max (!)… Also, Max doesn’t stop playing which makes us understand the delightful arrogance of his character!
Union Station (Rudolph Maté, 1950)
His final smile:  I don’t remember so much from this film (remember it was a good one), but this smile he does at the end is one I didn’t forget. It’s such a sweet and contagious one! The typical Golden Boy smile, you know!
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Stalag 17 (Billy Wilder, 1953)
When he discovers the guilty man and says “Ach so!” : This reminds me of my German classes as my teacher was saying that all the time. In this scene, he kinds of imitate Sgt. Johann Schulz (Sig Ruman) who is always saying that as well. We feel he is quite amused and satisfied as he will no longer be the accused one.
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When he cooks an egg: Just because this egg is cooked with so much style!
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Sabrina (Billy Wilder, 1953)

When he tries to guess who this beautiful lady is (Sabrina):  When Sabrina (Audrey Hepburn) comes back from Paris, she is waiting at the train station for her father who is supposed to pick her. David (William Holden) who is driving by suddenly stops because this beautiful lady certainly grabs his attention. He doesn’t know that she is Sabrina, the daughter of his family’s chauffeur, who has secretly always been in love with him. He offers her a lift and tries to guess who she is. We and Sabrina are obviously quite amused by the situation and things become even more priceless when he finally discovers her real identity. To think that he ignored her all these years!
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When he dances with Sabrina: That’s a beautiful moment full of tenderness and, one more time, we wish we could exchange places with Holden’s female co-star.
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When he sits down on a glass: To prevent his brother to go dance with Sabrina (and spoil his engagement to Elizabeth Tyson), Linus (Humphrey Bogart) invites him to sit on a chair where he has put a glass. Poor David! The glass obviously breaks when he sits down on it and he is in for a long convalescence. We feel sorry for David, but we certainly can’t avoid a few laughs!
When he falls on his butt but after sitting on the glasses:  During his convalescence, David is once again hurt by falling on his already damaged butt. Another hilarious moment that proves that Holden had a perfect comedic timing.
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THAT SMILE when Audrey Hepburn arrives at the ball: Once again, that’s a typical Golden Holden smile and it’s perfectly adorable. But who wouldn’t smile at the sight of Audrey Hepburn?
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The Bridges at Toko-Ri (Mark Robson, 1954)
When Grace Kelly waves at him and he waves back from the boat (the smiles): A quick but sweet romantic moment that perfectly expresses the love that these two have for each other.
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The Country Girl (George Seaton, 1954)
When he kisses Grace Kelly passionately:  On my! There’s full of passion indeed, but also tension in this scene. They are quarreling and he suddenly kisses her. Well, we’re not sure at first if it’s a way to express his love for her or if it’s just a way to make her shut up, but, no matter what, it remains an unforgettable moment that leaves you speechless.
Paris When it Sizzles (Richard Quine, 1964)
When he becomes a vampire: I don’t remember much from this film, but this scene is one that nobody forgets. The theatrical acting is so exaggerated (in an intentional way) and the make-up is so cartoonish. It makes this moment an unforgettable one. And a purple vampire! :O (strange)
You’ll find this moment in this trailer!
The Wild Bunch (Sam Peckinpah, 1969)
When he says “If they move, kill ’em!”: Wow! That’s a good way to chill our blood. This line is said without any pity and it immediately gives us the mood of the film. It also makes us realise that we are now far from the sweet Joe Bonaparte of Golden Boy.
Look at 2:10 to 2: 14 of this clip for this short line!
Every time he says let’s go: Robert Ryan says it too. It’s kind of something that unconsciously connects them. “Let’s go” is not something that seems quite extraordinary to say, but as it is said all the time in this film, it kind of became an iconic line(s). They even made a T-shirt out of it! 😉
Here is an example:
When he waves at Robert Ryan with his hat just before the bridge explodes: We (the spectators) know exactly what is going to happen so we can’t help anticipating this moment. This waving is full of arrogance which, one more time, perfectly shows us the nature of Pike Bishop (Holden).
Breezy (Clint Eastwood, 1973)
The most beautiful lines of the film:  When the two lovers find each other back at the end of the film, he tells her: “Hello, my love”, to what Breezy (Kay Lenz) answers “Hello, my life.” This is just one of the most beautiful moments from the film and it agreeably makes you sigh.
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The Towering Inferno (John Guillermin, 1974)
When he welcomes Paul Newman and they shake hands: Hum, nothing so extraordinary about that, but I guess I just like the idea of Holden and Newman shaking hands. Plus, this one is effectuate with an admirable determination. We like that.
When he feels guilty: It takes long before Jim Duncan (Holden) realises the extent of the catastrophe, but, when he does, he obviously feels guilty about it. He does that little move with his chin (a typical Holden gesture) and we almost have the feeling he is trying not to cry. Anyway, he looks very sad and that just breaks my heart. 😥
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When he punches Richard Chamberlain in the stomach : I know, violence is bad, but here I can’t help approving of this moment, because Roger Simmons (Chamberlain) certainly is one of the most annoying movie characters of all times.
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These are, of course, not all the William Holden’s movies I’ve seen, there are 14 more… And I probably have many other favourite moments that I’m not thinking of right now. You are more than welcomed to share yours with me and that might be a good way to refresh my memory!
To read the other wonderful entries for this blogathon, please click here.
Happy heavenly birthday dear Golden Boy! ❤
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Irish Film Studies: Irish Horror and The Hallow

This semester, I’m attending a course on Irish cinema. Each week, we are expected to write a blog-like journal about the film we watched in class and/or our class discussion about the film. I’ve decided to include those entries to my blog, so it would be more agreeable to read than a Word document. This is my journal entry for Iris horror cinema and The Hallow (week 13).

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I’m not really a fan of horror films, because I don’t like that much being scared, but, as a subject of discussion, I’ve always found it fascinating. Our last class was about Irish horror cinema and the film The Hallow (a quite recent one as it was released in 2015). It allowed me to have a view of the genre in a more analytical way than simply watch a scary movie and hide behind my pillows.

This semester, we’ve explored the way many different genres were expressed through the Irish nationalism: war movie with The Wind the Shakes the Barkley, biopic with Nora, Western with The Quiet Man, Noir with Odd Man Out (although Noir is not a genre, but more an aesthetic), teen movie with Disco Pigs, etc. It is always interesting to see the approach that is taken by different movie industries in order to develop a genre with their own signature. Sure,  The Quiet Man is an American film, but it takes place in Ireland and the idea of Irish nationalism is present enough.

But let’s get back to our main subject.

the-hallow

In the 2000s, Ireland began to witness a new wave or Irish horror movies such as Winter’s Head, Eclipse or, of course, The Hallow. Ian Cornish says of contemporary horror that it “provides a transcultural experience, one that demonstrates the striking presence of the genre globally and the levels of influence and crossover between different national forms and identities ” (1). Indeed, it seems that the different symbols of this nationalism have to be expressed in a horrific form. The thing is to find what the various elements of the film have anything to do with Irish culture and try to find their meaning, importance.

Sure, The Hallow is set in an Irish forest, but, except for this obvious element of “Irishness”, there’s more to it. Indeed, for example, in one of the two film reviews we read in class, it was indicated that the film was inspired by Irish mythology. The idea of folklore certainly has an important place in this film where the characters isolate themselves in a forest in a context of economic crisis.

Finally, I found interesting the observation that horror films are often very conservatives (fear of the unknown, the change, the madness, etc.). This goes in the same line of our week on Hush-a-Bye Baby where we learn about the Irish conservatism toward sexuality. Of course, this is something different, but the idea of traditional values is still here.

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Words: 417

Source:

(1) Conrich, Ian. ‘Introduction: Horror Zone.’ Horror Zone: the Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema. IB Tauris, 2009.

Images sources

“Film Review: The Hallow (2015).” Horror News, Sept. 2, 2016, http://horrornews.net/105577/film-review-the-hallow-2015/.

“The Hallow: la critique.” Films- Horreur.com, Mar. 10, 2016, http://www.films-horreur.com/2016/03/the-hallow/.